Self-Esteem

Sometimes the words you hear and the interactions you have with others can start to impact your mental health. Our brains start to believe the negative things people say to us. We begin believing that we are not good enough, or ugly, or fat, or not smart enough. We start telling ourselves these lies. Perhaps we start talking to ourselves in the way that others talk to us and it can change the way we see ourselves. We may begin to doubt ourselves. Our self-esteem can be affected by various different interactions, experiences and thoughts.
Some of the most common experiences and interactions that can affect our self-esteem include (this is not a diagnostic tool):
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Bullying

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Sexual abuse or rape

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Name calling

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Punching, kicking, or any other violence

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Being told you are not good enough

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Neglect

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Being abandoned

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Being ghosted

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Failure

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Rejection

The list can go on. It is common for some of these experiences to have long-lasting effects on our thoughts about ourselves and others. These thoughts may leave us feeling sad, lonely, and sometimes unlovable. Revival Counselling Services is here to support you. We provide a non-judgemental and supportive space for you. We are here to help you manage these thoughts and emotions. We can assist you in raising your self-esteem and how you view yourself.

References

Griffith, B. A., & Graham, C. C. (2004). Meeting needs and making meaning: The pursuit of goals. Journal of Individual Psychology, 60(1).

Shifron, R. (2010). Adler’s need to belong as the key for mental health. Journal of Individual Psychology, 66(1), 10-29.

Yang, J., Milliren, A., & Blagen, M. (2010). The psychology of courage: An Adlerian handbook for healthy social living. UK, Routledge: Taylor & Francis Group.